The Blog of Henry David Thoreau

by Caroline Brown

Curt shared a really good blog with me a few days ago: The Blog of Henry David Thoreau. The "blog entries" are really Thoreau's journal entries. Greg Perry, a poet, writer, photographer and blogger, posts Thoreau's journal entries on the day that they were written (though they were written in different years).

For example, today's entry, from May 19, 1859:

It is a warm, muggy, rainy evening, when the night-hawks commonly spark and the whip-poor-will is heard.

Here's an excerpt that I liked from yesterday's entry, dated May 18, 1852:

Fourthly, the forest, the dark-green pines, wonderfully distinct, near and erect, with their distinct dark stems, spring tops, regularly disposed branches, and silvery light on their needles. They seem to wear an aspect as much fresher and livelier as the other trees,— though their growth can hardly be perceptible yet,—as if they had been washed by the rains and the air. They are now being invested with the light, sunny, yellowish-green of the deciduous trees. This tender foliage, putting so much light and life into the landscape, is the remarkable feature at this date. The week when the deciduous trees are generally and conspicuously expanding their leaves. The various tints of gray oaks and yellowish-green birches and aspens and hickories, and the red or scarlet tops where maple keys are formed (the blossoms are now over),—these last the high color (rosaceous?) in the bouquet.

If you're into nature or HDT, it's a must-read. 

Image courtesy of The Blog of Henry David Thoreau.

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